Joshua

I wrote the soundtrack to a film called Joshua, directed by George Ratliff, with Vera Farmiga, Sam Rockwell, and Jacob Kogan, (who weirdly appeared in an joshuapic2.jpgepisode of Wonder Showzen). It is a thriller involving a small boy (who is a piano prodigy) plotting against his family; the score is a piano-based score with a lot of orchestral halo. Fox Searchlight is going to be releasing it in July, 2007.

Below, an excerpt from the end of the film, a slow and tense piece. I am really happy with the way this particular nugget turned out.

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Excerpt from Joshua
Caroline Pliszka, solo violin

NB The link above ““ which I will keep up as long as it is extant, has a preview of the film which uses a bunch of my music in the first two thirds, and then when the pace of the preview heats up, the sort of typical Showgirls synth drum stuff starts. Culturally, the way we prefer to indicate “excitement” has always been an endlessly fascinating thing to me, because I feel like I have a completely alternate way of getting at this sort of tension.

Joshua was recorded by Dan Bora at the Looking Glass Studios in September, 2006.

4 Comments

  • also, there was a collaboration of O Mio Babbino Caro, at that time.

  • Caroline sent me the link to your site. I enjoyed listening to the excerpt from Joshua. It was nice having you in Houston. Sue

  • This is probably the best score of 2007!
    Totally agree about the banalization of the “showgirls” like drums to indicate excitement. Thanks for bring a new voice to film music! Looking forward for your new scores, and currently digging into your concert work. Congrats!!

    Gustavo (São paulo/Brasil)

  • I just got the DVD of Joshua so I could experience your music for the soundtrack as part of the overall concept of the film. This is really impressive. The music works so well to enhance the tension of the film, and yet you don’t seem to be compromising anything from your own style of writing… Congratulations!